Shared Mobility Regulations in the Global South

Shared Mobility Regulations in the Global South

Jan 12, 2018

 

New mobility services pose both opportunities and challenges: they may reduce the number of single occupancy vehicles on the road and improve access to transport, but they can also reduce mass transit use, and increase congestion and pollution. Many governments are attempting to regulate these services to create a level playing field while keeping commuter interests in mind. To achieve desirable outcomes, it is critical for cities to send the right policy signals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities has undertaken an exercise to track and map shared mobility regulations in Brazil, China, India and Mexico. This is the first database of its kind that focuses on how cities in the global south are reacting to these disruptions. The database identifies similarities across geographies and points out unique features that can inform cities and decision-makers on how their peers are regulating shared mobility services in a pursuit of better mobility for all.

Access the database here.

We are only beginning to understand the impact of new mobility services and further studies are key to assessing the implications of regulations and how they shape the mobility ecosystem.

The database comprises national-, state- and city-level regulations that set standards for new mobility services or in some way influence how they operate locally. We mapped regulations from cities or states with more than 500,000 inhabitants. In China, 18 major city and national regulations are covered that influence an estimated 190 local regulations.

For more information about the database, write to us at innovation@wri.org


Image Credit: Photo Credit: Aashim Tyagi/WRI India
Jan 12, 2018